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9 Reasons Living in an RV Is Better Than Living in a House

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Think living in an RV full time is a desperate measure for folks with no other options? Rethink your priorties, mate!

Here’s a list of excellent reasons why living in an RV beats living in a house.

1. TRAVEL is the primary dream of most Americans, but first they’ve got to save up and work themselves miserable, then request vacation time off from their job. When you live in an RV, you get to travel all over America as part of your daily life.

2. LOCATION INDEPENDENCE. More and more jobs are becoming digital, which makes it easier to earn a reliable income while living on the road–or even telecommuting from a mountaintop or lakeside cabin. Forget moving for a job opportunity. Full-time RV living is all about living and working wherever you like!

why living in an RV beats living in a house3. SPECTACULAR SCENERY. People pay big bucks for houses that boast “million-dollar views”–but with an RV, the view out your windows can be whatever you most want to see that week, whether you’re camping there or just driving by.

4. LESS STUFF. Living in an RV full-time forces you to be mindful about your possessions, because there’s only so much that you’ll have room to store, care for, and clean. In our consumer-driven society, where your stuff most likely owns you (instead of the other way around), this is a major bonus to mental health.

5. TIME IN NATURE. Speaking of mental health, studies show that it’s crucial to spend time outside in the sunshine, breathing fresh air, feeling the breeze on our face. RV living makes you much less likely to while away the daylight hours on a couch, staring at a screen in a dark room. Plus, your backyard in an RV is huge, especially if you’re currently staying in one of our breathtaking national parks.

6. TINY BILLS = MORE FUN-MONEY. No matter how you slice it, even the most tricked-out RV is going to cost a fraction of what a nice house on a city lot will. Instead of being slowly crushed to death by a giant mortgage payment, you can free up your money for the really fun things in life. Studies show that people who spend money on experiences instead of stuff are happier, too, so it’s an all-around win.

7. FRIENDS EVERYWHERE. Living in an RV means you can go travel to see those friends who moved away, and then those other friends too… You won’t have to miss anyone for long. Even better, you’ll “find your tribe” in every new place you travel to, and eventually you’ll have a wide circle of true friends to visit everywhere.

8. BETTER RELATIONSHIPS. Okay, I’m not saying you’ll turn into a zen master once you purge all your stuff and move into an RV, but you’ll definitely become more mindful. Your family relationships will be put under the magnifying glass, being in such close quarters together–so you’ll be forced to work out your issues. You’ll also be more aware of how a few things out of place will make the whole RV feel messy–so you might become more tidy, too.

9. MINDFUL TECHNOLOGY USE. Living in an RV means you won’t have unlimited access to technology anymore. You won’t have utility bills (Yay!), but you’ll also be aware of the trade-offs that people make in order to have constant internet access and all the hot water you could wish for. RVing is a great way to make sustainability into something personal for you.

So, to summarize: no bills, more freedom, better relationships, and improved mental health. What else could you wish for?

Share this article if you agree living in an RV beats living in a house!

RV living

You can also check tips on what you need to do in case of an RV accident here.

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Suzanne
4 years ago

Nice article, but at the risk of being a “wet blanket,” I would also like to point out that according to RVIA, over 430,000 RVs were sold in 2016. I’ve been full timing for going on five years now, and the increasing crowds are shocking. I just think people should also be aware that “tiny bills” and “time in nature” also require a place to park it…often at an average of $30 per night. Yes, there is “boondocking,” or dry camping, but even that is getting a little too close for comfort. Just so people understand both sides of the… Read more »

Catherine Bleish
4 years ago
Reply to  Suzanne

I agree and think there is a HUGE need for more RV camping/parking nation wide!

Tara S
Tara S
4 years ago
Reply to  Suzanne

RV living is just trendy right now. Within a few years all the trend jumpers will have moved on to something else.
Just like the short-lived Tiny House boom.

Catherine Bleish
4 years ago
Reply to  Tara S

Tiny houses were not short lived!

tegwyn karaba
tegwyn karaba
4 years ago

Totally agree!

Dawn McCray
Dawn McCray
2 years ago

If is in prkg space size RV ….options of YMCA “SHOWERS” ? and what is best podcast that discusses RV EARNING CREATIONS for living incomes that support team hnology wise ?

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Christine
Christine
4 years ago

I wonder also how the environmentally-friendly sustainability aspect of van park locations adds up…. Do many parks have solar or other more eco/renewable electricity sources? Just leaving bills behind doesn’t mean good choices are being made where you do need to use power. Also gas/petrol… that needs to be seriously reassessed.

Catherine Bleish
4 years ago
Reply to  Christine

Our converted school bus makes electricity and charges our house batteries while we drive, although, if we park a long time we have to use a plug – in. Think about how much less power an RV uses compared to a house, even if plugged in! Its a huge difference!

Steve
Steve
4 years ago

Mate….you should seriously consider portable solar panels as an alternative/additional source of electricity…..also inverter power….a couple of “extra” house batteries ( high capacity gel batteries ) will also help. Be aware of how much power you draw especially at night….and plan to cover that necessary capacity. Portable WIFI for Internet coverage. If you are basically self sufficient :ie; onboard water and fridge/freezer/if your RV has its own shower and toilet , what more do you need.

Dick
Dick
4 years ago

We work at campgrounds, making your visit easier. The congestion you find is at parks close to big tourist attractions and beautiful scenery. Your average State, Federal or Local RV park or campground is usually pretty empty.

Bill Widmer
4 years ago

Great points! Gotta agree with them. Love the RV life.

Belgo
Belgo
4 years ago

Nah.. for reasons that fuel and parking cost more than living in a house or apartment and importantly for medical emergency.

Catherine Bleish
4 years ago
Reply to  Belgo

That is just not true! We pay much less in fuel and parking than rent in an apartment or house!

RMP
RMP
4 years ago

True – I’ve been tracking it for 12 years of living on the road…averages less than $1300/month including all campground membership fees, paid campgrounds, and diesel fuel. Our rent for an apartment in 1999 was more than that!

RMP
RMP
4 years ago

Seriously – could you not find a picture of an RV newer than the 1970/80/s to go with this article?

Catherine Bleish
4 years ago
Reply to  RMP

I picked the picture, I love it!

TriMoot
3 years ago

I love it too! AND…I am drawn to the older rigs as I feel they have so much character!
Sure sure…it’d be nice to have new this and new that, but there’s a love and comfort for restoring an older rig to running smooth and clean again. And keeps me busy….in a good way. Thanks for the article!

Dawn McCray
Dawn McCray
2 years ago
Reply to  RMP

If is in prkg space size RV ….options of YMCA “SHOWERS” ? and what is best podcast that discusses RV EARNING CREATIONS for living incomes that support team hnology wise ?

Marie Nice
Marie Nice
4 years ago

I can hardly park my car. I love the concept of RV living and travel but don’t think I could handle it. Darn!

Mo Renwick
Mo Renwick
4 years ago
Reply to  Marie Nice

Marie Nice, I’m turning 70 (and I’m female) and I drive a 39 foot 5th wheel. My husband and I share the set up. Been doing it for 4 years now.

Jeff
Jeff
4 years ago

I’m a tent camper from way back, but the wife just isn’t into it, so don’t really do it anymore. I’ve got a question for the RV folks, and please, be kind, as I just want information, not trying to be snarky or anything. I don’t own an RV, odds are I probably never will (who knows what will happen by the time I’m in my 60s though) but what do you when your “house” breaks down? I would assume you can’t just drop it off at a repair shop (since you live in it)… is repairing RVs a 24… Read more »

Marcia Likens
Marcia Likens
4 years ago
Reply to  Jeff

Good questions. We are full-time RVers with a 5th wheel. When a wheel bearing went out, we had to get a new axle. We limped into a campground; a mobile mechanic took care of it (2 days). We stayed in the rig. Friends have been towed to a shop, and stayed in rig there. Our truck still provided transportation, as would a toad on a motorhome. Yes, there may be a time a hotel is needed (but, we also carry tenting gear!)
We were forced into hotels when we owned sticks & bricks – floir refinishing, furnace failure, etc.

NMI
NMI
4 years ago

Love our retirement RV/home. Have everything we need, seeing this great country of ours since we never got to when raising our kids. Plus it gives us an idea where we want to land once we are done. “Trend”? <Marybe. But we are having a fine time while we trend! Meeting new people, loving our relationship. We have a budget, we try to stay in one place for a month or more, sometimes work part time when we want to for a free site. We don't own a car. We have scooters. A lot less gas use. This life is… Read more »

Sgt.Mom
Sgt.Mom
4 years ago
Reply to  NMI

We’re not full time RV’s but retired and travel on and off. We have a pull behind trailer instead of a motorhome. That way if the truck needs repairs, we have the trailer still, we don’t have to keep maintain insurance and engine upkeep on an additional vehicle. (We don’t have an expensive trailer – so we don’t insure the trailer itself, the liability for accidents in covered under towing vehicle. If we had an RV we’d have engine repairs, insurance costs and higher registration fees for something that gets used occasionally. We have friends that RV full time, and… Read more »

Mark R Hudson
Mark R Hudson
4 years ago

Spent 5 weeks driving around the States last year in June, with a cheaky trip to Niagra Falls. We travelled 9,500 + miles and spent less than $40 dollars on parking and getting rid of the grey water. Averaged $100 a day on fuel but that was down to having the AC on all of the time due to medical conditions. And obviously the milage travelled. Was amazed at the number of people who wanted to do the same but didn’t think that they could cope with the driving. We rented a 25ft RV. Paid for unlimited mileage. That and… Read more »

Dan
Dan
4 years ago

One HUGE drawback to living in a RV is the constant upkeep and maintenance. Those vehicles are only designed for weekend and occasional week vacation not full time living meaning you be fixing a lot of things. Ask any full time RV’er the roof leaks.

Will
Will
3 years ago

How do you make money while traveling?